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November 13, 2006

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Tommi Vilkamo

Once again, excellent post. I have nothing to add this time - but I just wanted to thank you for Presentation Zen. During this year, not only you have helped me improve my presentation skills, but also you have in many occasions clarified my thoughts and been a source of inspiration.

Thank you.

How Do We Know

This is a very cool synopsis of the concept.
I normally avoid the gyan books but you makeit all sound very interesting.
The sad part is that organisations are trying to deliberately manipulate everything that is informal, without any success in the formal things that they have earlier tried to manage, incl. advertising. In this way, they will only end up killing the concept of informality in brands related communication.

John Windsor

Sadly, too many companies act like your “doing it wrong” example, Garr. There’s a myopia that trades long-term growth for short-term results, and leads — in the case of presentations — to “safe”, boring, “Me”-focused pitches that weaken a presenter’s chances (and generate no WOM after the presenter is gone).

This is an age-old debate, of course (quotas & annual objectives v. long-term growth), but a marketer is not helpless here. In addition to Garr’s suggestions above, take his example and start a blog (if you haven’t already). But make sure it’s not just another vehicle for product or service pitches. In fact, don’t pitch your offering at all. Just make it the best damn source of information and insights in your industry.

Thanks for showing the way, Garr.

Dolan A.

What a minute. I'm on to the scam here! This is more of that word of mouth marketing!! j/k.. or am I..

The book sounds interesting. Thanks for sharing (p.s. I stumbled upon this site with Delicious!)

Heidi Miller

Thanks for the heads-up on this book, Garr; I can't wait to read it! It sounds like a lot of it reflects what I've been talking about in my podcasting seminars lately. In fact, I have a slide to illustrate the "people like me" concept to bring home the point that who we trust most these days is, in fact, people like us. (And no, it's art; no text on the slide!)

Dimitri

Thanks for the reporting on this book. I am reading your blog frequently and this article is more than just an usual easy talking on some other blogs...

thanks!

Mike Behr

Garr - great post. We are working with a client currently on revamping thier entire presentation as part of larger initiative. Your blog has been a great resource. I think a key point is to use the presentation not only as a chance to connect and inspire some word of mouth, but to start a new relationship of ongoing dialogue. A blog is just one example of ways to stay connect and continue to offer value.

Niko Neugebauer

Once again a great post. Its a pity, that the most of the presentations i have seen lately are actually more a kind "Microsoft presentation" - known as "buy it or else ..." Incompetent, unwilling to share and even those, which make me loose myself in my thoughts about other things and forget about those who are presenting. I am going to check out this book, it looks pretty interesting.

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