« The Presentation Zen gift buying guide | Main | Odds and ends to kickoff the year »

December 29, 2006

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451b64669e200d834d79e5053ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Have a Happy (and inspiring) New Year!:

Comments

Mike Kaspari

Thanks much for the holiday card. PZ was my favorite discovery on the web this year. PZ site epitomizes a principle I teach my students:
Quality = Design * Content

Getting Things Done in Academia
a guide for graduate students

Mike Kaspari

The second principle is "always proofread". ;-)

Ben Casnocha

Awesome quote Garr -- thanks. Happy New Year. I didn't make it to Osaka, unfortunately, on my last trip to Japan, but I hope next time. If you make it to San Francisco drop a line. Thanks!

John Windsor

Nice post, Garr. Great way to ring in the year.

Moses Ting

I agree with your thoughts on this one. We're so caught up in our everyday lives - running from meetings to meetings, wanting to experience as much as possible, and living off the business "high" - that we often forget to stop and smell the sweet roses. Or in your case, enjoy a nice run on the beach.

Parag Shah

I absolutly agree with you. It seems that in the race to know everything and continue being competent, spending the time for soul searching seems impossible.

A few years back I had attended a Vippassana session. It was 10 days of "no talking", "no tv", "no reading/writing"... just meditation, and believe me it was just wonderful. I have never felt so energized by any other thing.

Wish you a happy new year and thanks a lot for sharing your thoughts with us on this blog.

Bill Harris

Thanks for the support for the idea of alonetime. I drew a similar conclusion in my recent "Music lessons (for organizations)" at http://facilitatedsystems.com/weblog/2006/12/music-lessons-for-organizations.html .

Greg B

More mono no aware in running. Love it. I was just thinking about how precious each step was at the end of my run this morning. Each step is there and then gone forever. Each run is cataloged and contemplated and then its gone to memory. Each run is connected in some small way to all the others in the last 13 yrs of running. This adds to my sense of perspective, being able to quietly contemplate their connectedness in solitude after my run is done or perhaps during my run. Its the sense of perspective that one gets from this inactive action that allows me to further my focus at work, interacting with my wife or kids, or just problem solving on the way into work.

Now I'll have to go and see what George Sheehan says about all this in his book Running and Being. Happy New Year!

Andrew Horton

Garr
Thanks for this and all your fantastic thoughts and inspiration in 06. Have a great 07!
Andrew

Steve N.

Happy New Year to you and your wife. Thanks for the nice article about "alonetime." Here's to some of that precious time alone to think and process in 2007.

Juan Alonso

Have a nice new year all of you!

Zaid

I wonder if there are people that tend to rely on solitude more than others to figure things out?

After observing myself in past few years, I've realized that I like to take my time and think through problems. The problem is sometimes those problems are very simple - yet, my brain refuses to process it even a bit until I'm left alone.

Secondly--and may be some entrepreneurs can relate to this--I have periods of say days or weeks where I'm "subdued" and less communicative with folks around me. This is also the time my brain is processing some exciting idea to new, different levels.

I think if you're someone who gets and idea and loves to yell it out to the world, next time just sleep and think over it for week or two. It annoys my family when I get in this phase of quiet thinking but business and creativity-wise, it brings in great results!

-Zaid


SSB

My experience is meditation or a visit to a holy place (temple in my case) always helps in focussing.

When I used to prepare for exams, I always tend to go to a temple to relax myself. Instead of just praying, I step back and assess the situation and comeout with plans. Everytime when I come out of temple, I will have a clear plan and feel rejuvenated.

Reed Bailey

Thanks for the Oregon coast and sand. Rain, it seemed to be raining, is beautiful and has a metronomic and soothing effect on the senses. The addition of a cadence of foot steps adds to the simplicity and peacefulness of the beach. Silence, alone time and meditation are seen by many as doing nothing. I have the intuition their perspective lacks creativity. May you be blessed and may others be blessed by you. Keep writing, have fun,
Reed

The comments to this entry are closed.

Search this blog

Get the books

TEDx Talks



Subscribe

Your email address:


Powered by FeedBlitz

Twitter Updates

    follow me on Twitter

    .