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September 23, 2008

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Jon Thomas

Awesome presentation. I think the typeface works - very different from most seen in PowerPoints, and it's big enough to make up for the "bleed" within the letters.

TED scores again with another interesting topic and presentation.

Spammer Charlotte Ritter

We're sorry, your comment has not been published because TypePad's antispam filter has flagged it as potential comment spam. It has been held for review by the blog's author.

Thanks

Jan Schultink

Thank you for leading me to this video.

One thing to add: David is an example of how it is possible to speak at very, very high speed and be fully understood.

Thomas

Very very interesting.

One question: which company makes the short slide-like presentation video? It's brillant.
(

Matt Edmundson

A friend of mine has just done an unusual pitch. I thought it was very well done - she wants people to invest in her music and made it real easy to understand how:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpGgwuGqtNM

The only thing wrong with this - the link to her site is not working! Lesson - it doesn't matter how great the presentation - check the detail!

The website: http://www.thisislindsey.com/

Hagay Levy

Just to add regarding the relevant topics for investor presentation (taken from www.investmentslides.com):
1. Company introduction: Venture Capital and Private Equity funds don’t invest in
companies or technologies – they invest in people. That means you! Therefore the initial section of the investment presentation must present to the prospective investors that you
and your team can execute the plan – present your experience and expertise and what makes you a great team.

2. Mission statement: Start-up's should use one sentence to state their goal. Don’t be
afraid to be bold – you are expected to, but keep it short and avoid generalized
statements. More mature companies, company presentations to private equity funds,
should include a short description of the company's business and positioning.

3. Pain and value proposition: whether it is a technological edge, a strong client base or amazing manufacturing power - both start-ups and mature companies should state
their value proposition in a clear (preferably visual) manner. Very often (particularly in the event of a startup) it is recommended to introduce the value proposition slide with a preliminary slide describing the specific market failure you address.

4. The product/solution/service: investor presentations should include 2-3 slides
describing your specific offering. When presenting a technological solution, it is
important to consider the technical aptitude of the audience ahead of time – investment presentation delivered to financial oriented audience should cover your relative advantages, but shouldn’t be too specific on technical subjects

5. The market and competition: describe your market and competitors honestly in 2-5
slides. Do not try to underplay your competition, investors see many venture capital presentations and may have met with your competition… In mature companies,
investment presentations may contain references to the company's status in the form of a Porter 5 forces model analysis.

6. Business Model: a venture capital presentation delivered by a start up company needs to convince that the company has a solid business model that will empower actual gains.

7. Case study/Client base: a VC presentation can be empowered by actual proof of concept in a form of an actual client or (preferably in many cases) a canned demo. In an investor presentation aimed at raising funds from private equity, a description of current client base is important, as it is typically the major asset the company holds.

8. SWAT analysis (Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats): this slide is
important in mature company's analysis. Nevertheless, it can also be useful in certain VC presentation cases

9. Financials: the message delivered in this section changes from private equity and venture capital presentation. In the case of a start-up, the company should prove that it can gain significant cash flow from its activity. Mature companies need to provide further information beyond future cash flow analysis, as this information is needed for the company valuation. This additional information can include balance analysis, changes in
working capital etc.

10. Summary: provide one slide describing your offering. Remember to emphasize the
top key issues you want investors to remember from your venture capital presentation
Please visit my web site at www.investmentslides.com for a full coverage of this specific niche.

loan reference

thank you for that video..

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