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May 12, 2009

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A Twitter User

Garr, I often reference your work as a benchmark for my participants to follow, I enjoy reading your blogs and find them a great and stimulating resource.

Re the above, I agree with you that Sir Kens tells well articulated, humorous and memorable stories. His delivery is to be admired. But I don't think that it's a great presentation.

I think it is a disjointed collection of stories and I reckon he makes some of the presentation up along the way. For example he finishes his presentation with a quote from Jonah Sulk (if all the insects were to disappear etc) and finishes that quote with "and he is right" to much applause. What's the relevance! he does this all the way through his presentation and I ask myself, so what, why did he tell me that. I have also asked many people what they think. I'm not totally alone. 1/3 ask so what and wish he would get to the bloody point, 2/3 love him to death and feel moved and inspired.

I think he could have done more with his 20 minutes given that it was meant to be the presentation of his life and would be viewed by millions.

Having said all that I only know half the story. I don't know what his objective was and don't know who he was directing his message to.

I have a transcript if you want it. I sent it to Ted, it was posted with all my errors removed. I don't think its there now.

Thanks Garr

Cheers
Justin

Garr

Thanks Justin. You make many good points. I actually do not disagree with you for the most part, but for Ken this style works. 4 million have watched his talk so far so it has made a connection with more people than just myself. But yes, the points you make are not invalid. However, I do think he made his point even though it was quite a simple (but important) one. His message was sticky.

Anyway, thanks very much! Ciao. g

Jan Schultink

Great post, thank you.

TED's 18 minutes are like the 140 characters of Twitter: keeps you in check.

Also, the beautiful video recordings make sure that presenters do not need to worry about stand alone slides living a life of their own online post-presentation.

Monica Diaz

Love the TED TALKs and love your take on how to make a presentation good! Thanks! I usually do no words, only photos presentations and they always command attention. I believe too many words is commonplace and makes for some boring talks!

Tyler Hayes

Awesome post, there's nothing like TED Talks! But your link colors are blinding my eyes, and I'm only 23 so I'd like to keep them for a bit longer if thats OK with you.

Wally Bock

Garr – what a great range of helpful examples. Thanks.

Howard Poon

An excellent post Garr. Found through a tweet from saman325.

Kimberly McCabe

TED presentations are amazing. They always manage to keep you captivated by using what they have to say in a concise and yet entertaining manner. It challenges my ability to multi-task...I want to watch and listen! Plus I like the "speak of thy failure..." point. Right? What better way to make a connection with the audience and create a more intimate emotion in the room. Love it!

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