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June 30, 2009

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Claudio Perrone

Garr, you made excellent points. I mostly do technical presentations and I now structure them around a dramatic compelling story (not just anecdotes) in which the technology/process/idea plays a key role. Needless to say, the feedback is always fenomenal.

Christian Esteve

I started thinking different in my technical (computer science) presentations after reading the Zen book and having "suffered" as attendee in many talks given at academic conferences.

I found that one can always create a story around the context and contribution of your paper. Visuals and moving away from the bullet point style are indeed powerful techniques.

They makes the more amenable for attendees, and for the talker, it should not make any difference whether you have or not the spoken words on the screen. You (should) know your stuff well enough that just the title and the visuals suffice to trigger the content delivery process inside your head.

My two cents, technical presentations can be engaging by using the presentation zen techniques without loosing any degree of credibility. In any case, there is your published paper to dig into the details and your talk should be about giving the key messages of your contribution while advertising your paper and motivate people to read it!

Here is one of my latest attempts towards a more engaging technical talk on network architectures: http://www.dca.fee.unicamp.br/~chesteve/pubs/CPqD-WS-InternetDoFuturo-information-oriented-090416.pdf

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