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August 21, 2009

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Michael Eury

I completed the quiz and the results said I am also Helvetica, so naturally I agree with all you have written!

L.

I think that one important reason people hate Helvetica is that it is often a lazy, default, safe choice. "Nobody got fired for using Helvetica", sort of thing. So it can stifle creativity simply by being so flexible and ubiquitous.

Rebecca Schwartz

I'm only pointing out paragraph 2, second sentence, because you wrote an entire post about apostrophe errors just yesterday.

garr

D'oh! Thanks Rebecca! -g

Richard Michie

Always loved Helvetica and always will. Simple is beautiful

Matt Henry

I was always amazed by how you could take an average, perhaps slightly blurry photograph, overlay some Helvetica type and it casts the entire picture in a different context. It's no longer an amateur photograph, but it gains some status. The perfections suddenly feel like artistic decisions worthy of contemplation.

That's just a random example of how I've noticed the power of Helvetica recently. I watched that film earlier this year and I've been thinking a lot more about typefaces in general, with Helvetica in the forefront. I love the comparison of Helvetica to white rice, and I find it incredibly refreshing to see it used in design.

By the way, I'm a design student studying abroad in Japan for 6 months. I just found your blog, and I couldn't conceive of a topic that interests me more than the subjects you write about. Great job!

Steve Bowman

Seen on a big red t-shirt on a big guy walking down the street at Drexel University:

Sex,
Drugs,
Helvetica Bold


John Haydon

Great movie, by the way!

Presentations Training

In a global multilingual society, we often do rely on the font to communicate what the text probably reads when we do not completely understand. It is good to be neutral where the item is one of neutral consequence.

John

I was thinking of all the great fonts that I might be - maybe something smooth, something a little curvy, something fun - and I turned out to be Helvetica as well!

Drue Kataoka

Garr - beautful and thoughtful post as always. I like your take on Helvetica.

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