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March 19, 2012

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Peter Richards

Excellent selection of thought provoking videos. There is so much excellent thinking and ideas out there to help our children achieve. I could not let the chance go by to include Sir Ken Robinson's wonderful TED presentation "Do schools kill creativity?". In fact, I seem to remember that I came across this video first linked from one of you posts. http://tinyurl.com/yv7wvz

garr

Thanks, Peter. Yes, the 2006 Sir Ken Robinson video I have linked to a few times in the past. I love that one. Watched probably 20 times or more with students, etc. Thanks for the link. Cheers! -g

N. Risma Liasari

Thanks a lot for this post, and also other wonderful posts of yours on this blog! Greeting from Tokyo!

Jenny Luca

Thanks Garr. You've just provided me with my opener for my Yr 10 English students tomorrow, many of whom are focused on assessment. Maybe if they see that quote from Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, it will hold more weight than it does when I say it!

Mike Sporer

Garr....I've seen some of these, yet I was compelled to watch them again. Great selection, and I love Dr. Tae. The work Seth did is new to me. "making the frying pan smaller lowers the size of the fish you need to catch". I will use that one!

Jenny

I love Neil! I think we should just put him in charge. Of like, everything.

 Romeo Lame

Thank you for sharing. Great videos!

Jonathan Briggs

Did you know that Shawn Cornally (in your list) and Dr. Tae were both at TEDxEastsidePrep. Tae adds in a few new ideas since he originally shot the "Building a New Culture of Teaching and Learning" video. http://www.tedxeastsideprep.com/dr-tae/ or see it on his home page drtae.org

Dunhill

Rethinking Schools has assembled two new books that focus on what teachers are really accountable for: the learning, empowerment, and well-being of their students. This issue of the magazine highlights five new articles from those books.

AZDave

Great essay! I recommend that people read Gatto's book, "Dumbing us Down." He is quite provocative, and the lack of citations or references can be frustrating if you want to follow up on some of the historical references that he makes. But, what he has to say regarding his experience as an award winning public school teacher is eye-opening and mind bending.

Gatto has been an advocate of home based education - the idea that one can structure his or her education around their community via self learning, on-line learning, traditional classes, and cooperative classes.

My wife and I are now wrapping up a 25 year home education experiment with our three children and it has gone remarkably well. They are elite students, two with perfect SAT scores, and many achievements. And they are more than fine socially.

For people with children, especially young children, you feel trapped in sub-standard public schools, home schooling is sometimes the only viable option. They can't afford to wait for reforms that have been promised for the past 30-40 years.

Its fun to talk about how we could improve the schools if we had the freedom to experiment. But for the past 30-40 years of this ongoing discussion, its been just talk for most of us.

Home based education allows you to take responsibility for your children's education now.

MikeReading

Thanks so much for taking the time to compile these videos - there is a wealth of great stuff here!

Henry Rivers

I thought Neil was really excellent! Let's get him some time on national tv!

AZDave

The "A" is irrelevant? Hardly. Mastery of one's chosen field of study or work is very important. An "A" is a good indicator of technical mastery or literacy. While an "A" in calculus in high-school might not be a predictor of future success as a car salesman, it does matter if you are going to be a CAD software designer.

The real issue is that kids are forced thru a one size fits all education system. If the average student is a "C" student, why is it surprising that "successful" people, on average, were "C" students?

Perhaps those "C" students were "A" students in their chosen field.

Amanda

Excellent post. As an ex-teacher I can only say that kids are taught in 15 years what they could do in 2 ! So much time is wasted teaching nonsense, kids are often more intelligent than the teachers !

Bernard

Thanks for this sharing this "view list". The Ken Robinson RSAnimate video is probably not connected with his TED-talk (but with an RSA-talk): http://www.thersa.org/events/video/archive/sir-ken-robinson. But they are almost the same :-) There even is a transcipt of this lecture: http://filmenglish.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/transcript-sir-ken-robinson.pdf

celine outlet

Great essay! I recommend that people read Gatto's book, "Dumbing us Down." He is quite provocative, and the lack of citations or references can be frustrating if you want to follow up on some of the historical references that he makes. But, what he has to say regarding his experience as an award winning public school teacher is eye-opening and mind bending.http://www.celinebagscheap.com

Spanish Translation

I think the question that "Do schools kill creativity?" is obsolete now a days. I think they are more focusing on reducing the stress and the teachers are better equipped to handle the kids and pressure. These video lessons are really essential as they really help in reducing the class work and students can come back home and visit those lectures!

Theresa Southern

I think these videos are great. One comment caught my eye though. A home schooling dad seemed to be defending his choice with this statement: "They are elite students, two with perfect SAT scores, and many achievements."

However, I can't help but wonder if he hasn't missed the point here. Having "perfect SAT scores" and "many achievements" is not and should not be seen as signs of success.

Are high SAT scores proof of actually understanding something?

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